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The French Apartments

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  • #16
    Re: The French Apartments

    Don't have a clue Phyl. Not a clue. Sorry...

    "CC"

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    • #17
      Re: The French Apartments

      Crazy thing:
      The French hospital i believe was founded by a french order of nuns. I think at one point it was called the Franch Catholic Hospital.
      There is a nun buried in the yard.
      And the crazier thing is i live practically next to it and found out my father was born there.
      Karmic i guess.

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      • #18
        Re: The French Apartments

        Doing a little bit of searching on the hospital came up semi-empty, but i found this cool bit, circa 1969:

        History - Chelsea
        Chelsea dates back to 1750, when Captain Thomas Clarke acquired all of the land from 14th to 27th Streets between Seventh Avenue and the Hudson River. In the 1830's Captain Clarke's grandson, Clement Clarke Moore, subdivided and later sold the estate for residential development. Moore, a noted biblical scholar, was best known for his poem, "The Night before Christmas."

        Elegant townhouses in Federal and Greek Revival styles, built in the 1830's and 1840's, line 20th, 21st and 22nd Streets between Ninth and Tenth Avenues.

        Clement Moore donated some of his land to the General Theological Seminary, which occupies the block between Ninth and Tenth Avenues, from 20th to 21st Streets. A series of neo-Gothic buildings, some dating from the 1830's, are built around an interior courtyard and sheltered from the street by a high wall.

        In 1851 the Hudson River Railroad was extended to 30th Street. Industry and shipping followed. Soon manufacturing and goods-handling activities dominated most of the land west of Tenth Avenue. East of Tenth Avenue tenements were built for workers, predominantly Irish immigrants, but including many Greeks, Italians, Scots, French, Spaniards and eastern Europeans. Many of these tenements today house Chelsea's growing Puerto Rican population.

        The City's first elevated rapid transit liner, the Ninth Avenue El, was built in 1871, accelerating the decline of parts of Chelsea's residential areas.

        In the 1880's and 1890's many of the City's finest theaters, hotels, restaurants and fashionable department stores were built on 23rd Street and along the Avenue of the Americas (then Sixth Avenue) from 14th to 23rd Streets. The original Stern Brothers, B. Altman, Hugh O'Neill, Simpson-Crawford, Adams Dry Goods and Siegel-Cooper located here. Most no longer exist; their buildings have been converted for industrial or other commercial use. The landmark Hotel Chelsea, built in 1884, was one of the City's first cooperative apartment houses. Converted to a hotel in 1905, it remains a popular residence for people in the arts.

        By 1900 the wealthy had moved out of Chelsea, and 23rd Street had begun to decline. Newly arrived immigrants and low-income workers moved into the area. Townhouses became rooming houses. Crime and disease flourished. Hudson Guild Neighborhood House, an important force for social reform in the community for more than 70 years, was established during this period by the Ethical Culture Society.

        Between 1904 and 1915 Chelsea was the center of a growing motion picture industry. Many industrial loft buildings were converted into studios where such stars as John Barrymore and Mary Pickford made films.

        The three-way division among industry, low-income housing and luxury housing which exists today stems from the late 1920's and 1930's. Parts of the area deteriorated during the 1920's, but the Depression and later, rent control, kept many families in the area who would otherwise have been forced out. During these years London Terrace Towers was built on 23rd Street between Ninth and Tenth Avenues. Other luxury apartment houses followed.

        Residential renewal of Chelsea continued after World War II, as older buildings were renovated and new ones built. Elliott Houses, a low-income development completed in 1947, was Chelsea's first public housing. It was followed by Chelsea and Fulton Houses, the latter containing special units for the elderly. Penn Station South, a middle-income cooperative development, was finished in 1962.

        Private rehabilitation has been intensive in Chelsea since 1960, spurred by the municipally supported Chelsea Neighborhood Conservation Program, active block and community organizations and a high demand for luxury apartments and townhouses. The blocks between 20th and 22nd Streets from Seventh to Tenth Avenues are being transformed dramatically as individuals purchase and restore 19th century townhouses and plant trees along the streets. Prices for these houses range from $40,000 to $100,000.

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        • #19
          Re: The French Apartments

          Hey, really interesting Vespa. Thanks for posting! The last line caught my eye though. What houses are they talking about that range from $40,000 to $100,000? Are they talking about now?

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          • #20
            Re: The French Apartments

            I wish. Naw, I think it was in 1969 when they were revamping from hospital to apts.

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            • #21
              Re: The French Apartments

              The hospital was the one Don Corleone was taken to after he was shot in the novel The Godfather.

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              • #22
                Re: The French Apartments

                REALLY? What about in the movie?

                Originally posted by Baby Watson View Post
                The hospital was the one Don Corleone was taken to after he was shot in the novel The Godfather.

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                • #23
                  Re: The French Apartments

                  I was actually born in French Hospital. I believe that it was one of the first non-residential buildings in the neighborhood to be turned into a residence. I've always been curious about what the apts. look like.

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                  • #24
                    Re: The French Apartments

                    The French Building also has that cool footbridge that links the 30th Street and 29th Street buildings. It's about four floors up over the courtyard. I used to stand on my roof when I lived on 29th Street and marvel at the old skybridge. It always has little curtains in the windows as if people lived in there, but it also seemed to be not tall enough for most people, and I never did actually see any life inside.

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                    • #25
                      Re: The French Apartments

                      The French apartments was a hospital I got stiches there in 1972 so it was still a hospital then, it was a decent hospital, Related Management, is the company that runs it now. There are section 8 apts in there and regular apts as well, I have seen an apartment style once and it was actually very nice, although i know there was a morgue in the basement and have spoken to a older man that also works as a guard at night and said he hears strange things at night. Spooky....

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                      • #26
                        Re: The French Apartments

                        Its entrance on 30th Street was used in the exterior shots of the hospital in The Godfather. Take a look.

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                        • #27
                          Re: The French Apartments

                          Originally posted by Chelsea Born View Post
                          The French apartments was a hospital I got stiches there in 1972 so it was still a hospital then, it was a decent hospital, Related Management, is the company that runs it now. There are section 8 apts in there and regular apts as well, I have seen an apartment style once and it was actually very nice, although i know there was a morgue in the basement and have spoken to a older man that also works as a guard at night and said he hears strange things at night. Spooky....
                          That's funny. I used to work in 360 w 31 street for 18 years for Sears. One day, in our employee store, a display fell and opened a rather nasty wound on my head. I went to the French hospital for stitches too.
                          roby2000

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                          • #28
                            Re: The French Apartments

                            Oh and there's the founding nun buried in the yard.

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                            • #29
                              Re: The French Apartments

                              I lived in the French Apts. for almost 30 years. When I moved in, it was mostly low income families. Part of the building is federal Section 8, part is straight rent. I lived in the 30th St. building, but it also has a smaller building on 29th St. attached by a 4th floor walkway, which is now part of a handicap apt. The building has a string of handicap apts - one on each floor, beside the back elevator. The apts. on either end of the 30th St. building are one bedroom apts. The rest are either 1-3 bedroom apts, which is still mostly low income families. The size of the apts. is great, but one of the best things about the apts. is that because it was a hospital, the walls are very thick, and you can't hear your neighbors at all.

                              I've never seen the Lobby run down. Its not the greatest of colors, but then not everyone has the same taste. They always keep the lobby and floor halls very clean tho. Some of the upper apts. have wonderful balconies with the best views in town. Those of course, aren't section 8 apts however.

                              I moved to Princeton, NJ a couple of years ago, but my son still lives in the 30th St. building. He loves it.

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                              • #30
                                Re: The French Apartments

                                Wow! Thanks for your perspective. I never knew what it was like as an apartment building (as I mentioned above, I was born in French Hospital; my parents had a long four block trip back to our apartment).

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