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Speaking of 18th and 8th...

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  • #16
    Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

    I'm still missing Healthy Chelsea. Vitaldent, fooey.

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    • #17
      Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

      Originally posted by wbfnyc
      Agree with you all. First Big Cup, then the lighting store, then Details, now the Hardware Store by the corner of 19th have all closed. It is a little disconcerting.
      That big hardware store is gone now, too?

      Damn. What's happening to my neighborhood?

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      • #18
        Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

        hi gato, actually the are having a closing sale 50% off everything. it is sad.

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        • #19
          Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

          i totally don't understand the cream puff store....it's odd. i tried one. they are good. the coffee is good too. and it's the cheapest on the block. even cheaper than dunkin donuts.

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          • #20
            Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

            Originally posted by JCon23
            ...and it's the cheapest on the block. even cheaper than dunkin donuts.
            That's how they Get ya'.

            CD
            Need computer assistance?
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            • #21
              Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

              Some of you might want to check out the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation: http://www.gvshp.org I suggest you get on their mailing list. Although a lot of their efforts have to do with the village, they are our neighbors, and I know I want to preserve the architectural beauty and low-rise character of the Village and Chelsea, and I know some of you do, too! Here's a sample letter I got from them today, which includes some great news and some info about the building-to-be in the parking lot on 8th Ave. and 14th St.:

              PRESERVATION ALERT
              from the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
              May 2, 2006
              www.gvshp.org

              *HISTORIC VICTORY: FAR WEST VILLAGE LANDMARK DISTRICTS
              UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED!

              VOTE PUTS LANDMARK DESIGNATIONS IN PLACE IMMEDIATELY,

              Follows 2-year intensive campaign for landmark & zoning protections,
              Comes more than 40 years after Jane Jacobs first pushed for landmarking of area

              *City Approves Design for Undulating Glass Building at 122 Greenwich Avenue

              FAR WEST VILLAGE LANDMARK VICTORY!: History was made this morning when landmark protections that GVSHP and countless others fought to extend to the Far West Village were unanimously approved by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The LPC approved an expansion three blocks west of the existing Greenwich Village Historic District, and the creation of a new Weehawken Street Historic District, covering a total of five blocks and about sixty buildings. Historic buildings in this area will now be protected from demolition or inappropriate alteration.

              Last year, following an intensive campaign led by GVSHP calling for zoning and landmark protections for the Far West Village, the City agreed to substantially downzone the area (i.e. reduce the size and height of allowable new development) and to extend landmark protections to several blocks and several individual buildings in the area. The downzoning was enacted last October, and today’s historic district designations deliver most, but not all, of the landmark protections promised by the City for the area; eight individual sites the City promised to landmark are yet to be considered. However, today’s designation did include three buildings GVSHP had fought to have added into the districts – 139 Charles Street, 143 Charles Street/687 Washington Street, and 177 Christopher Street. For a map of the designated districts and related actions, see www.gvshp.org/FWVmap.htm; for pictures of today’s hearing and designation, see www.gvshp.org/FWV.htm.

              Today’s historic vote came just a few days after the death of Jane Jacobs and a few days before what would have been her 90th birthday on May 4th. Going at least as far back as 1963, Jane fought to preserve the Far West Village, urging it be included in the Greenwich Village Historic District being contemplated at the time (see www.gvshp.org/documents/VanDerpool.pdf). Unfortunately, when the Greenwich Village Historic District was designated in 1969, much of the Far West Village was excluded, though neighborhood activists and preservationists consistently pushed to have the area landmarked. Today’s vote marks the first expansion of the Greenwich Village Historic District since its designation in 1969. The only other expansion of historic district protections in Greenwich Village since 1969 was the 2003 designation of the Gansevoort Market Historic District in the meatpacking district, a designation proposed and fought for by GVSHP.

              While not including all areas GVSHP had fought to have landmarked, today’s historic district designations, combined with the still-promised designation of six individual landmarks, protects an incredible cross-section of the Far West Village’s unique residential, industrial, maritime, and civic architecture. The districts contain some wonderful early 19th century brick Federal-style rowhouses and two rare wooden houses, several early 19th and 20th century stables, a surviving former sailor’s hotel, some grand Romanesque-style warehouses, an early New York City police station and public school, and an unusual bohemian-style church. For pictures and more information, see www.gvshp.org/block630.htm, www.gvshp.org/block631.htm, www.gvshp.org/block632.htm, www.gvshp.org/block636a.htm and www.gvshp.org/fwvlpcsub904.html.

              Today’s victory could not have been possible without the support and participation of literally thousands of people over the years. However, GVSHP would like to extend a special thank you to the Greenwich Village Community Task Force, with whom we worked closely on this landmark and downzoning proposal, and the Federation to Preserve the Greenwich Village Waterfront and Great Port. We would also like to thank the Westbeth Artists Residents Council, the Historic Districts Council, the NY Landmarks Conservancy, and the Municipal Art Society, who were strong supporters of the effort. We would also like to extend special thank you’s to City Council Speaker Quinn, Manhattan Borough President Stringer, and State Senator Duane, all of whom were strong supporters of the proposed landmark designations. Countless Community Board members, block association chairs, building captains, and average citizens also worked incredibly hard to help make this victory possible.

              GVSHP wants to thank the Landmarks Preservation Commission for this historic vote, but also to urge them to keep the remainder of their promise for the eight additional individual landmark designations in the neighborhood.

              HOW TO HELP:

              WRITE TO THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION thanking them for their vote and urging them to fulfill the rest of their public promise for landmark designations in the Far West Village as soon as possible. Go to www.gvshp.org/FWVletters.htm for a sample letter you can use and contact information.

              To see the NY 1 report on today’s designation, go to www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=59070.

              Undulating Glass Tower in Greenwich Village Historic District Approved: The LPC giveth, and the LPC taketh away. A few hours after approving the historic extension of landmark protections to the Far West Village, the LPC also approved a controversial design for an undulating glass tower on a parking lot at 122 Greenwich Avenue (at 8th Avenue and 13th Street – for pictures, see www.gvshp.org/122GrAvpics.htm). GVSHP had expressed deep concerns to the LPC about the proposed design and its inappropriateness for the Greenwich Village Historic District, and had urged the Commission to reject or alter the design to make it more in keeping with the character of the historic district. Council Speaker Quinn, Borough President Stringer, State Senator Duane, and Assemblymember Glick, as well as a broad array of local and citywide preservation organizations, had also urged the Commission to reject the design as is.

              We are very concerned about this approval for several reasons, and wrote to the LPC Chair after the last hearing on this item when it seemed clear that the Commission was moving towards approval to express these concerns (see www.gvshp.org/documents/GrAveLPClet.pdf). Special thanks go to State Senator Duane and Assemblymember Glick, who also sent similar follow-up letters to the LPC. We feel very strongly that the purpose of historic districts, which cover only about 2% of New York City, is to preserve and reinforce the unique historic character of areas containing some special significance. It is hard to imagine how an undulating glass tower, even on what is now a parking lot, accomplishes that goal, and we believe there could have been many other more appropriate options for a design on this site. Also, the success of the landmarks system depends upon the willingness of owners to accept the burden of regulation and the requirement for maintaining the historic integrity of properties which comes with it. GVSHP is concerned that approval of a design such as this not only undermines the integrity and character of this historic district, but may reduce the willingness of owners to support and abide by the system if they do not feel that its provisions are being applied consistently and fairly.

              The design for 122 Greenwich Avenue will still require a variance from the Board of Standards and Appeals to build about 15 feet higher and slightly larger than the underlying zoning for the site allows. That will require a public hearing at the Community Board and the Board of Standards and Appeals, though no date has yet been set. Should the BSA reject the variance, it would reduce the size of the building slightly, but not necessarily prevent the development or the approved design from getting built. GVSHP will keep you posted when the dates for these hearings are set.

              For more information on 122 Greenwich Avenue, go to www.gvshp.org/122GrAv.htm.

              To join GVSHP or support our preservation efforts, go to www.gvshp.org/membership.htm.

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              • #22
                Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                As noted above Jane Jacobs died last week at the age of 89.
                Anyone that enjoys walking down a tree lined street owes her huge debt of gratitude.

                "Jacobs came down firmly on the side of spontaneous inventiveness of individuals, as against abstract plans imposed by governments and corporations," wrote Canadian critic Robert Fulford. - Wikipedia

                CD
                Need computer assistance?
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                • #23
                  Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                  i just saw that 'details', the home furnishing store on eighth is closed, as is the stationary store on 23rd between 8 and 9

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                  • #24
                    Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                    The ghosts of 8th ave. The gutted out cigar store, the erie demolition on 18th and 8th , the wipe out of buisness on 8th Ave in general is very odd and out of step with our wicked sister the MPD. Can anyone tell me what is happening with the lovely building that went up over Viceroy?
                    fauxfurr

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                    • #25
                      Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                      GREAT news that McDonalds is NOT going to go into the former Pine Tree Deli on 8th & 18th. I confirmed with the building's owner that a lease has been signed but it is NOT a food establishment. Hooray!

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                      • #26
                        Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                        So relieved that Mikkie'Ds is not going to be our neighbor. What is the situation above Viceroy? Beautiful job on the building but no movement for months. Any inside info on the X' Details or the X'Big Cup?
                        fauxfurr

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                        • #27
                          Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                          Construction is going on at the Pine Tree site. Anyone know what's going in? And if you say "Duane Reade" i'll cry.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                            I am wondering too, and if anyone knows what is happening with the building above Viceroy fill us in.
                            fauxfurr

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                            • #29
                              Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                              Re the 18th and 8th site (SW corner) - there’s a large sign on the outside wall around the construction for a future Valley National Bank. I assume on the ground floor, with apts. above?

                              I'm wondering myself about the old Pine Tree site (NW corner 18/8). I’ve looked in, and at the permits on the window, but can't tell a thing. I miss them because they were usually REALLY QUICK in the morning, and I'm usually running late. And it was one-stop shopping - bagel and newspaper from the same counter. (i.e., no separate visit to the back of the store to get my bagel.)

                              By the way, I hadn't been to Bed Bath and Beyond (18th and 6th) in several months, and just discovered they’ve converted their hardware section to.....a drug store! Yes, a mini Duane Reade right there in the middle of BB&B!

                              In their favor, they do have something like 100 (or maybe even 200) drugstore items available in travel/sample size. Most drugstores have only a small number, so if you're planning a trip, BB&B might be worth a visit.

                              P.S. The personal care items (loofahs and such) have been folded into the drugstore section.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Speaking of 18th and 8th...

                                Duane Reade's not gonna stop until they have a location inside each and every Manhattan apartment!

                                By the way, this is interesting because one of our members, a commercial real estate consultant, mentioned back when we were talking about the 23rd St D'ag closing that drug stores and banks are about the only things left that can still make a profit and pay these sky-high rents. So everytime I hear of a bank or a Duane Reade taking over a location I think "he told us so".

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