Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"World Trade Center"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "World Trade Center"

    I'm curious about how fellow Chelseaites feel about the upcoming film "World Trade Center." And, do you think you'll go to see the film?

  • #2
    Re: "World Trade Center"

    Originally posted by chelseachick69
    I'm curious about how fellow Chelseaites feel about the upcoming film "World Trade Center." And, do you think you'll go to see the film?

    I don't know much about the film "World Trade Center", but even if it's supposedly a "good film", I do know that I have no desire to see any movie about 911. It would be too upsetting for me. I saw and experienced enough of the reality right here in Chelsea, and all over NYC.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: "World Trade Center"

      Yeah. Actually, I'm kind of conflicted myself. I'm not sure that I'm ready to watch a filim that depicts the loss of my (4) friends and so many others that perished that day. Additionally, I volunteered for the search and rescue team at Chelsea Piers the very next day. (I'm certified in CPR and have some voluntary training in "Life Saving" techniques through a couple of free NYC progams). I mean, I love Nick Cage, and the guy from the movie "Crash" who co-stars but, to relive that event might just be too "real" for me personally.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: "World Trade Center"

        I too find it hard to contemplate going to these movies about 9/11. I went to see United 93 after much procrastination and in the end I was really glad I did. I found it to be incredibly moving and stirring. I think it's good for us to remember what happened. And as close to it as many of us here were (including myself), I realized while watching United 93 that much has slipped from memory about that day. I think I will ultimately see this one although no doubt - like you guys - it will be hard to get myself to the theater.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: "World Trade Center"

          Originally posted by vbad
          I too find it hard to contemplate going to these movies about 9/11. I went to see United 93 after much procrastination and in the end I was really glad I did. I found it to be incredibly moving and stirring. I think it's good for us to remember what happened. And as close to it as many of us here were (including myself), I realized while watching United 93 that much has slipped from memory about that day. I think I will ultimately see this one although no doubt - like you guys - it will be hard to get myself to the theater.
          After I answered (my own) question on this thread, I was thinking about how going to see this film is kind of like passing a tragic accident on the highway. You are too horrified to keep looking as you pass, but for some reason you just cannot look away at the same time. I've really not forgotten much of the experience; it's almost as vivid as it was that day. But, maybe you're right. Maybe by going to see the film, in some way would be a cathartic and healing experience. Somehow, the film being directed by Oliver Stone could quite possibly be "stirring," like you said. He's got a very pointed directorial style about him. At least to me. He has a way of making films that can be extremely thought-provoking. That's just my opinion. So, maybe I'll relent. We'll see.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: "World Trade Center"

            It seems strange to see a movie about somthing that we all lived through. Why do we need a movie to see what we have already seen in real life? Moreover, Nicholas Cage playing the lead makes this look like a movie, but for us it was real life. Turning your own real life experiences in a movie is strange. I think that it would have been better if Stone had used good but unknown actors for this movie. In my mind's eye, unknown actors could merge into the great mass of injured and victimized people who were there. If it's a known actor, you know that he was not there, and you know that the movie is not real.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: "World Trade Center"

              Originally posted by rsikorski
              It seems strange to see a movie about somthing that we all lived through. Why do we need a movie to see what we have already seen in real life? Moreover, Nicholas Cage playing the lead makes this look like a movie, but for us it was real life. Turning your own real life experiences in a movie is strange. I think that it would have been better if Stone had used good but unknown actors for this movie. In my mind's eye, unknown actors could merge into the great mass of injured and victimized people who were there. If it's a known actor, you know that he was not there, and you know that the movie is not real.
              You know, you're right. I'm thinking, if Oliver Stone had made it into a docudrama or something of that ilk. I like your idea that unknown actors would've been more feasible. That said, I'm still debating whether or not I want to see a pseudo-reenactment of the death of 4 of my friends. Everytime I see the commercial for the movie, I get a pang in my stomach. Even though it's going to be 5 years since 9/11, it's still way too real for me.

              Now with the news that there was a plot to blow up more jets on their way to the U.S., I'm kind of feeling it to some degree all over again.

              CC69

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: "World Trade Center"

                I saw the movie on Wednesday with a neighbor, while she liked it I was not overly impressed. The story was really about the human spirit during that time. However it could have been placed anywhere: a mine cave in, people trapped in rubble after an earthquake. It just so happens he uses the backdrop of the WTC. The horrific events of that day where just enough and not overly done which was a blessing. All in all I just found it OK

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: "World Trade Center"

                  I saw some of the firemen who were at 9/11 interviewed after the movie premiere. They seemed to have been really touched and healed by it. I thought that was impressive - as far as the question "why should we see what we already lived through?" goes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: "World Trade Center"

                    “I live here, so I experienced it firsthand,” Louis Cintron, 15, said yesterday as he left the first showing of “World Trade Center,” Oliver Stone’s film about Sept. 11, which had its nationwide premiere yesterday.

                    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/10/ny...gewanted=print

                    He saw it with about 40 people at Regal Battery Park Stadium 11, a theater near ground zero and near his home.

                    “I saw the buildings fall. I wanted to see how they would make it and what the police and firefighters went through,” Louis said of the film. His mother, Carmen Cintron, dabbed at her eyes with a tissue, almost too overcome to speak.

                    That intensity was exactly what Sharon Van Cleaf, a bond trader from Staten Island, said she wanted to avoid. She skipped “World Trade Center” and instead chose “Talladega Nights,” a raucous comedy at the same theater. “Right now, I can’t,” she said. “I don’t have the courage yet.”

                    Interviews with filmgoers at two Manhattan multiplexes yesterday showed that many were drawn to see the highly anticipated “World Trade Center” because of Mr. Stone’s reputation, because of their own experiences of 9/11 or because the film focused on recent history. But some drawn to other movies said that their painful memories of the bright September day the towers fell would keep them away from “World Trade Center.”

                    The film, starring Nicolas Cage and Michael Peña, tells the story of John McLoughlin and Will Jimeno, two Port Authority police officers who were among the last people pulled alive from the rubble.

                    “I don’t want to see it,” said Joey Prio, a 15-year-old from Flushing, Queens, who was with friends at the AMC Empire 25 on West 42nd Street in Midtown, where the film was also playing. “I think it’s too early to see something like that.”

                    Joey’s friend Liz Panczyk, 16, of Rockland County, said she knew others who felt that way, some because they lost loved ones on 9/11. “My friend’s dad died,” she said. “They had five kids. She doesn’t want to see it.”

                    But Irwin and Susanna Goldman, a retired couple who live near Chinatown, said their sharp recollections of 9/11 drew them to “World Trade Center.” They caught an early afternoon show at the Midtown AMC theater.

                    “We want to see how they depict the actual occurrences,” Mr. Goldman said. “The memories are always there anyway. This is not going to make it worse.”

                    Also at the theater yesterday was Ian Henson, a 20-year-old film student who said he was drawn because of Mr. Stone’s reputation for making engrossing, complicated films about big political issues.

                    “I’m interested in seeing what Oliver Stone did with the film,” said Mr. Henson, who lives in the East Village and attends Pratt Institute. “People were seeing many films about World War II right after the war. If we’re not ready for it now, when are we ever ready for it?”

                    Those interviewed after the 11:30 a.m. showing in Battery Park City described “World Trade Center” as variously wrenching, painful, claustrophobic and uplifting. It is rated PG-13 and carries a warning of “intense and emotional content, some disturbing images and language.”

                    After watching the film, Rabbi Mayer Schiller, who teaches the Talmud at Yeshiva University High School for Boys, said: “It showed the good that people can do. I feel that life has heroes.

                    “It’s unlike the one about the plane — that took you and left you devastated,” he said, referring to the earlier 9/11 movie “United 93.”

                    With him was Matis Haller, a stay-at-home father from Rockland County, who said that knowing that the two officers survived made it bearable to see them trapped underground, dehydrated and writhing in pain.

                    Tony LaRusso, a retired railroad electrician from Madison, N.J., could persuade only one friend, Jim Hackett, a retired carpenter from Hopatcong, N.J., to see “World Trade Center” with him, he said.

                    “It happened in my time,” Mr. Hackett said, explaining why he showed up when others begged off. “It’s like my father with Pearl Harbor. They attacked my country, in my time.”

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: "World Trade Center"

                      I saw WTC a few weeks ago while still in preview, but I would have paid to see it. We live here, so 9/11 is up close and personal to us, but not necessarily so for the rest of the world. My feelings: there were thousands of stories that came out of the day, and those stories should be told so no one forgets what happened on that day.

                      WTC and United 93 were both honorable and respectful, and I hope that the stories to be told will all be done so well. WTC was about how ordinary people step up and do extraordinary things, less about the horrors of 9/11.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: "World Trade Center"

                        an entire issue devoted to the 9/11 event

                        http://www.newyorkmetro.com/news/features/19147/

                        It is almost five years since that fear was imposed on us and the age of terror began in earnest. From the moment the Twin Towers fell, 9/11 was seen as a watershed, a historical turning point of grand and irreversible proportions. With the acrid smoke still swirling above ground zero, the mantras repeated constantly were that 9/11 had ?changed everything??that ?nothing would ever be the same.?

                        By now we see those mantras for what they were: natural, perhaps inevitable, exaggerations in the face of gargantuan trauma. So much about how we live our lives today remains the same as it ever was. And yet, at the same time, we all know (or think we know) that vast changes have in fact been spawned by 9/11?political, cultural, and sociological; intellectual, emotional, and psychological?in New York, throughout America, and around the world. The question is precisely what they are.

                        As a way of marking the fifth anniversary of 9/11, we?ve attempted to provide an answer?or, rather, many answers. But we?ve done so in a roundabout manner: by asking an assortment of big thinkers and public figures to address the question, What if 9/11 never happened? Now, let?s be clear, we?re well aware that the dangers of counterfactual speculation (If Bobby Kennedy had never been shot, then Nixon would never have been elected! So no Watergate! No Carter! No Reagan! Etc., etc., etc.) are almost as grave as those of unbridled futurism. But we also see the virtues of an approach that appeals both to left-brain analytics and right-brain imagination?and that, in the process, tends to uproot subterranean assumptions and challenge conventional wisdom.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: "World Trade Center"

                          Hi to all,
                          I really wanted to like this movie more but I just couln't get into it. I really preferred Paul Greengrasses film "United 93" so much better. Maggie Gyllenhaal and Maria Bello gave noteworthy performances.
                          aa batterien

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X