Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chelsea Click Your Activities!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Dollar Sign of the Times

    I saw an article, Class Clowns, on one of our local improv comedy troops Upright Citizens Brigade in todays NYT. Thought it would be nice to link to it for Chelsea Click Your Activities UCB listing. However placing a link to it will work now but after a while this may be converted into a pay to view link.

    So first off here's the link which will work for a while at least.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/ny...pagewanted=all

    and secondly, and just as interesting here's the price the NYT would charge if I wanted to reprint this article on a non profit website like this one. The price is... $600. I don't think the Times will be getting my business anytime soon.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Chelsea Click Your Activities!

      Southpaw - thanks for posting all these events. It's nice to have it all in one place.

      I can't get over that NYT charge! $600 and that's just to post it for a single year! You'd think for $600 they'd let you post it for life and invite you out to lunch! They just recently stopped charging for NYT Select their for-pay online service. I guess they didn't have enough takers - although they had me.

      I'm surprised they don't charge $300 to post a link to an article!

      Comment


      • #18
        Dollar Sign of the Times

        Originally posted by Jonathan View Post
        Southpaw - thanks for posting all these events. It's nice to have it all in one place.

        I can't get over that NYT charge! $600 and that's just to post it for a single year! You'd think for $600 they'd let you post it for life and invite you out to lunch! They just recently stopped charging for NYT Select their for-pay online service. I guess they didn't have enough takers - although they had me.

        I'm surprised they don't charge $300 to post a link to an article!

        Jonathan, I had a lot of trouble believing the price the Times wanted to put this on line, and being for just one year made it even more unbelieveable. And then there's my favorite case ...

        "Jon Else is a filmmaker. He is best known for his documentaries and has been very successful in spreading his art. He is also a teacher, and as a teacher myself, I envy the loyalty and admiration that his students feel for him. (I met, by accident, two of his students at a dinner party. He was their god.)

        Else worked on a documentary that I was involved in. At a break, he told me a story about the freedom to create with film in America today.

        In 1990, Else was working on a documentary about Wagner?s Ring Cycle. The focus was stagehands at the San Francisco Opera. Stage- hands are a particularly funny and colorful element of an opera. During a show, they hang out below the stage in the grips? lounge and in the lighting loft. They make a perfect contrast to the art on the stage.

        During one of the performances, Else was shooting some stage- hands playing checkers. In one corner of the room was a television set. Playing on the television set, while the stagehands played checkers and the opera company played Wagner, was The Simpsons. As Else judged it, this touch of cartoon helped capture the flavor of what was special about the scene.

        Years later, when he finally got funding to complete the film, Else attempted to clear the rights for those few seconds of The Simpsons. For of course, those few seconds are copyrighted; and of course, to use copyrighted material you need the permission of the copyright owner, unless ?fair use? or some other privilege applies.

        Else called Simpsons creator Matt Groening?s office to get permission. Groening approved the shot. The shot was a four-and-a-half-second image on a tiny television set in the corner of the room. How could it hurt? Groening was happy to have it in the film, but he told Else to contact Gracie Films, the company that produces the program.

        Gracie Films was okay with it, too, but they, like Groening, wanted to be careful. So they told Else to contact Fox, Gracie?s parent company. Else called Fox and told them about the clip in the corner of the one room shot of the film. Matt Groening had already given permission, Else said. He was just confirming the permission with Fox.

        Then, as Else told me, ?two things happened. First we discovered ... that Matt Groening doesn?t own his own creation?or at least that someone [at Fox] believes he doesn?t own his own creation.? And second, Fox ?wanted ten thousand dollars as a licensing fee for us to use this four-point-five seconds of ... entirely unsolicited Simpsons which was in the corner of the shot.?

        Else was certain there was a mistake. He worked his way up to someone he thought was a vice president for licensing, Rebecca Herrera. He explained to her, ?There must be some mistake here. ... We?re asking for your educational rate on this.? That was the educational rate, Herrera told Else. A day or so later, Else called again to confirm what he had been told.

        ?I wanted to make sure I had my facts straight,? he told me. ?Yes, you have your facts straight,? she said. It would cost $10,000 to use the clip of The Simpsons in the corner of a shot in a documentary film about Wagner?s Ring Cycle. And then, astonishingly, Herrera told Else, ?And if you quote me, I?ll turn you over to our attorneys.? As an assistant to Herrera told Else later on, ?They don?t give a ****. They just want the money.?

        reprinted from " Free Culture" by Lawrence Lessig is available for free under a Creative Commons license. (You may redistribute, copy, or otherwise reuse/remix this book provided that you do so for non-commercial purposes and credit Professor Lessig.)

        Comment

        Working...
        X