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Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

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  • Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

    Strange thing...
    So in the back of the Village Voice classifieds (old school, I know), was an ad for the Vigilant Hotel, which it turns out is $140/week for a room.
    Check out this interesting and sort of crazy piece about it on another blog.

    http://evgrieve.com/2008/12/checking...rfect-for.html

    Reminds me of the place on 30th that is gone, but is now (again) a hostel of sorts for short term stays ((They did a nice reno on it, btw, and the guys that work there are super nice)).

    The Vigilant, it seems...is another story.
    As in, stay vigilant.
    Just sayin'.
    __________

    The historical bit is v. interesting from that blog btw:

    In 1895 the lodgings empire of Angelino Sartirano consisted of hotels at 116 Gansevoort St., 208 and 352 8th Ave., 1553 Broadway, 2291 3d Ave., and here at 370 8th Ave. The Sartirano (sometimes spelled Sartirana) hotel business is even older, going back to 1888 with his first hotel at 116 Gansevoort St. in the West Village. The name Vigilant Hotel, however, is not quite so old, and seems to date no earlier than 1916. The hotel is still here (as of August 2003) but to all appearances no longer operates as a hotel in the usual sense...

    >>oh yes, it does...
    Last edited by Vespa; 03-04-2013, 11:34 AM. Reason: Typo

  • #2
    Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

    This is something from 2012.
    Whoa. Who knew?

    This Is What It Takes To Get Kicked Out Of The Cheapest Hotel In Manhattan
    http://articles.businessinsider.com/...nt-bank-teller

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    • #3
      Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

      Whoa is right Vespa! That's hilarious! Like something out of the 19th century. We should all go book a night there!!

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      • #4
        Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

        Originally posted by Vespa View Post
        This is something from 2012.
        Whoa. Who knew?

        This Is What It Takes To Get Kicked Out Of The Cheapest Hotel In Manhattan
        http://articles.businessinsider.com/...nt-bank-teller
        The author should take a look at the Harlequin Studios in the Theatre District. For about $10 a hour, today, you can rent a piano there. They've got a picture of the Platters up on the wall who they claim rehearsed there many moons ago. It's an odd looking place that has seen better days. Bet it as an interesting history too.

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        • #5
          Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

          No kidding talk about old NYC. Like when there were pickpockets leaning against the walls on 42nd St.

          Random, semi related factoid this hotel reminded me of....
          A couple doors into 29th St, a few doors over from the place under construction on 29th and 8th on NW corner is a building where a very very famous poet's father stayed in a rooming house (said to be wild, famous, and full of writers) and cafe over 100 yrs ago. You can tell sort of because there is a flat area in front of the building that was the cafe's outdoor seating.
          ...it was William Butler Yeats' father. Discovered this working on a project about modern art in NYC. I think JB Yeats knew people in the Ashcan school of art, and hung out in front of the building all the time with his arty posse, drinking coffee, and probably other stuff too.
          Anyway, a digression.
          See below---From the Princeton archive.
          Building should be protected I'd say. Dunno what on earth a Pepitas sister is. Stay-tuned...
          --------------
          John Butler Yeats was born in the parish of Tullylish, County Down, Ireland, on March 16, 1939. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in 1862. In 1867 he ended his career as a barrister to pursue his life-long interest in drawing at Heatherley's Art School in London. Yeats went on to become a talented and well-known, albeit moderately successful, portrait painter, primarily of Irish writers and prominent people in the theater.
          Yeats was also the father of four artistic children, including the poet W. B. [William Butler] Yeats, and the painter and illustrator Jack [John] Butler Yeats.

          In December, 1907, Yeats accompanied his eldest daughter, Susan Mary [Lily] Yeats, to an embroidery exhibit in New York City for what was intended as a short visit. However, Yeats remained there for the following 14 years and never returned to Dublin. He took up residence at a boarding house run by the Petitpas sisters at 317 West 29th Street, and participated in the literary and art communities of the city. In New York, Yeats continued to paint portraits and sketch for commissions, as well as for friends and himself. He also wrote several essays on subjects that included art, Irish issues, and women, and was a public speaker at venues in the eastern United States. Within his circle of artistic friends in New York, Yeats was known as an exceptional conversationalist. During this time he nurtured friendships with Martha Fletcher Bellinger, the writer Van Wyck Brooks, Mary Tower Lapsley Caughey, the miniature painter Eulabee Dix [Becker], the painter John Sloan and his wife, Dolly, Ann Squire, the lawyer and art patron John Quinn, and several others. Yeats maintained contact with his family in Europe and friends in America through extensive correspondence.
          On February 3, 1922, Yeats died, leaving behind an unfinished self-portrait, commissioned by Quinn, that he had been working on for 11 years. He is buried in Chestertown, New York, near Lake George in the Adirondacks.

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          • #6
            'Yeats at Petitpas'

            The Petitpas sisters also maintained a French restaurant on the ground floor of 317 W 29th; in warm weather there was outdoor dining in the garden behind the building. The restaurant was later taken over by their brother, and judging from ads in the NY Times, the Petitpas restaurant continued to operate until the early 1950s, when 317 and 319 West 29th Street were renovated and joined into their current configuration.

            In 1910, John Sloan painted a group portrait of a literary evening at 317 West 29th Street: 'Yeats at Petitpas'; depicted, left to right, are Van Wyck Brooks, literary critic, John Butler Yeats, Alan Seeger, poet (best known for I Have a Rendezvous with Death), Dolly Sloan (John Sloan's wife), Celestine Petitpas, proprietor of the boarding house, R.W. Sneddon, playwright, Mrs. Charles Johnston, wife of a friend of the Yeats family, Eulabee Dix, painter, Frederick A. King, literary editor of the Literary Digest, and John Sloan himself, in a self-portrait:

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            • #7
              Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

              Some great history here; thanks everyone!

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              • #8
                Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

                that hotel has brought a lot of creepy people into the area but i am seeing less of them lately.

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                • #9
                  Re: Vigilant Hotel...0n 8th Ave nr 28th

                  Never noticed. Must read more on Years. Had an elderly acquaintance who met Yeats. She died last year at 97.

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