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What are Chelsea' s borders

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  • What are Chelsea' s borders

    Yesterday, I looked at 5 maps and not one of them agreed on the boundries for Chelsea. A few maps showed Chelsea is bordered on the eastside by 5th ave and some showed 6th ave. The southside was either 14thst or 15th st. All the maps agreed the westside was the Hudson River. Now for the northern part of Chelsea, it was up in the air. 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th or 34th st.

    I have to admit when I moved to Chelsea, for a number of years, I thought Chelsea went as far north as 23rd st. I was corrected by someone who lived on 25th st. Does Chelsea go as far north as 34th st?

    Bob

  • #2
    Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

    Well, I've heard that the police department defines the northern border of Chelsea as W 30th St. In fact, they said - the southern side of W 30th. The northern side of 30th - is not considered Chelsea - by the police dept. So, for whatever that's worth. I have to say after walking around Chelsea a bit, the far northern end feels much different than the more southern end - in the teens. There seems to be a distinct difference in feeling south of 23rd street - in my opinion.

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    • #3
      Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

      I've always thought that Chelsea went from 14th Street to 34th Street, and from 5th Avenue to the Hudson River.

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      • #4
        Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

        didnt the zoning regulations of the "chelsea borders" change in the past 10 years, making the area larger?? I dont remember where i heard that, but I thought it was about the same time that some of the new high rises between 23rd and 30th street started being built.

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        • #5
          Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

          LeeLee, you're thinking of the Chelsea historic district, which was enlarged in 1981. This is a small portion of what most people consider to be the Chelsea neighborhood. You can see the maps at:

          http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/html/maps/maps_manh.shtml

          I think each city entity has its own definition of each neighborhood's boundaries; they're not official in the code or zoning. Real estate brokers also have their own definitions, thus the "inclusion" of blocs all the way up to the low 30's in "Chelsea", it sounds better than the Garment District south or Midtown West and has the cachet of the Chelsea name. I live on the south side of 23rd Street and agree there is a marked change once one crosses north of 23rd Street. However, there is an officially named "Chelsea Park" in the block between 9th and 10th and 28th and 29th Streets, so maybe it is still Chelsea. I think it would be fairer to call anything above 24th or 25th Streets "Chelsea North", the feel of the neighborhood is completely different.

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          • #6
            Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

            Hey Bob - I love the Eyes! That's very cool!

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            • #7
              Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

              I joined CCYB yesterday and just came across this thread. I hope it's still active, so I'll give it a try...

              I might have some information on this subject since I'm Chelsea born and bred (in the last century; wow - feels cool to say that!)

              The real - as opposed to geo-political - borders of Chelsea have never been really well defined. The south side of 14th Street is definately the Village and the Hudson (North) River is definately the western border (DUH!). Rumor has always had it that there's something called "Jersey" beyond the Hudson that's there basically to keep Philly from encroaching on New York in general and Chelsea in particular.

              The eastern border was generally defined by how far west one lived. For me (9th Avenue), it's always been 6th or 7th, for others 5th, though once you could see the Flatiron, you were absolutely at the border. Interesting history here: prior to the events of September 11, the greatest loss of life suffered by the FDNY was across Broadway from the Flatiron where, in October, 1966, 12 Firemen died in the line of duty at the Madison Square Fire. There's a brass plaque on the 23rd Street side of the high-rise, right at the east-bound 23rd Street crosstown bus stop marking the event. The credit for this plaque being placed there goes to a retired FD Chief who still lives here in Chelsea.

              As for north, some took the border as 34th Street others as the Morgan Post Office on 9th Avenue (ie, north side of Chelsea Park). A lot of this particular point depended upon whether one used Clement Moore's farm or the Chelsea docks as the reference. Don't confuse the "Chelsea docks" with todays "Chelsea Piers." The Chelsea docks were a large part of the lifeblood of this neighborhood and, indeed, the city. I remember seeing hundreds of longshoremen walking west toward the docks early every morning, each carrying a bailing hook and heavy work gloves heading to the shape-up for the day's back-breaking work. This was in the days of block-and-tackle-and-muscle, before the cranes and containers killed the piers and the thousands of jobs that went with them. In those days the Chelsea docks were the busiest docks in the busiest port in the world.

              Most of today's "townhouses" and $3,000/month walk-up studios were, back then, rooming houses (for today, read SRO) for Merchant Mariners on the beach for a few weeks before they'd get another berth and ship out again.

              That's not to say that the longshoremen weren't here. They certainly were. Many of the "older" gentlemen who you see in the neighborhood are them themselves and deserve your respect for the work they did.

              As for "North Chelsea," "Chelsea Heights" and any other appelations, these are the brain explosions of real estate brokers, developers and those wanting to bail out of their condos and co-ops with the extra money that a grand-sounding cachet might afford.

              Chelsea Park was the home for the neighborhood teams (Little League, PAL, parishes) in softball, roller hockey, and touch football. They were sponsored by the many small banks, butchers, florists, markets, TV repair shops, shoe repair shops, stationery stores and other mom-and-pops which flourshed here and provided after-school jobs for the neighborhood and kept kids out of trouble.

              On Sunday mornings, the Sea Scouts would march up 10th Avenue from Guardian Angel led by Msgr. Renschlier (sorry if I got the spelling wrong, Monsignore). The Sea Scouts were another organization that kept the local kids involved and out of trouble and gave tribute to the maritime tradition upon which Chelsea thrived. Guardian Angel was the Shrine Church of the Sea and the home of the Chaplain of the Port of New York.

              As for the Police Department, I'm not sure of the exact date, but probably in the '60's or early '70's, the City decided to redraw all the precinct boundray lines to conform (more or less) to the political and Community Board lines. Prior to that, the 10th Precinct borders ran from 5th Avenue to the river, 14th Street to 34th. Some folks defined Chelsea by that map. Above that, what is now Midtown South was known as the 14.

              People need to know and understand that today's COOL Chelsea - Piers, galleries, clubs, swank restaurants, Starbucks, Gaps, condos, co-ops and other trendies - has a REAL history peopled by REAL lives and that if you're LIVING here instead of just staying here it needs to be appreciated in its good, not-so-good and bad.

              That's all I can think of for now. I'll post anything else I can think of later. If you have questions, comments or anything to add or correct, please do so.

              Hope everyone enjoyed the weekend and has a good week.
              Last edited by SNAP; 12-04-2006, 03:46 AM. Reason: spelling errors

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              • #8
                Re: What are Chelsea' s borders

                People need to know and understand that today's COOL Chelsea - Piers, galleries, clubs, swank restaurants, Starbucks, Gaps, condos, co-ops and other trendies - has a REAL history peopled by REAL lives and that if you're LIVING here instead of just staying here it needs to be appreciated in its good, not-so-good and bad.
                Thanks Snap. You took all the words out of my mouth. I feel like the newer crop of NY'ers aren't residents, they're tourists that are staying here.

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